Clovis Points

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Escapule Site, Arizona; found with mammoth bones. University of Missouri Eichenberger Collection 67-18.
Escapule Site, Arizona; found with mammoth bones. University of Missouri Eichenberger Collection 67-18.
Clovis point replication by by George Nichols; glass material. University of Missouri Eichenberger Collection 78-16.
Clovis point replication by by George Nichols; glass material. University of Missouri Eichenberger Collection 78-16.
Rummells Site, Cedar County Iowa. University of Missouri Eichenberger Collection 67-11.
Rummells Site, Cedar County Iowa. University of Missouri Eichenberger Collection 67-11.
Murray Springs, Arizona; found under a mammoth rib. University of Missouri Eichenberger Collection 69-32.
Murray Springs, Arizona; found under a mammoth rib. University of Missouri Eichenberger Collection 69-32.
Mastodon State Park, Missouri; found associated with mastodon remains. University of Missouri Eichenberger Collection 79-21.
Mastodon State Park, Missouri; found associated with mastodon remains. University of Missouri Eichenberger Collection 79-21.

The stone-tool complex known today as Clovis dates to the end of the Pleistocene (last ice age), from roughly 9250 B.C. to 8950 years B.C., and represents the first Paleoindian culture in North and South America. Clovis artifacts appear suddenly and around the same time throughout much of the New World and are named after the city of Clovis, New Mexico where examples were found in 1929. They vary greatly in size but the channels or “flutes” at the base on each side of the projectile points are their hallmark feature.